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Wild About Autumn

Wild About Autumn

Autumn is perhaps the most beautiful time of year to visit Scotland. The landscapes are ablaze with colours of amber, crimson and rust, while the skies glow purple and orange. Capture the last days of golden autumn on a family day out you’ll never forget. Here are a few reasons we’re wild about this season.

 

Family walking

 

Flowers & Foliage

The main flowering season may be over but, luckily, there are still a number of plants that continue to bloom until the first frost arrives. Hydrangeas become deeper and richer in colour; the petals of the hardy fuschia enhance in hue, and the mighty begonias blossom into the darker winter months. Take a walk anywhere and you’ll see nature’s palette of bronze, red, crimson, yellow and orange. Deciduous trees – like beech, birch and horse chestnut – are the ones to look out for. They’re found in most woodlands walks and forest parks, or nestled against the backdrop of lochs.

 Leaves

 

Woodland Walks

It’s not yet too cold to stay indoors so make the most of the scenery and venture out on an autumn adventure. You can enjoy the wildlife in peace as midge season is over! The Trossachs is only a 20-minute drive away and offers a variety of walk including Drum Wood, the 17-mile Mell Circuit, and the two Corbetts of Ben Ledi and Ben Vane. Walks along the Allan water are incredibly beautiful - check out our Walking Guide for a full list of walks.

 

Leafy path

 

Birds

All of the Highlands' finest resident birds and mammals are in clear sight in autumn. Keep an eye out for otters, red deer and red squirrels, as well as golden eagles, buzzards, crested tits and more! Autumn also brings some new arrivals such as grey geese and whooper swans from the Arctic, with some still in summer plumage.

 

Bird

 

Harvest Feasts 

Indulge in some of the most amazing local produce from the autumn harvest, including perfectly ripe apples, plums, pears and damsons. Lamb is at its most succulent and game is readily available. Contrary to the old wives’ tale – oysters and other shellfish should be eaten only in months with an “r” in them – our native Scottish oysters are at their most delicious from October through the colder months. There’s no better way to finish off the day with a wee dram beside a roaring fire, what more could you want!

We'll be serving up some seasonal produce in The Kailyard Restaurant at the hotel - check out a few sample menus to whet your appetite.